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Maria mantessoris thesis about education and children

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Montessori believed that the chief role of educators was to assist children to teach themselves in a free, but structured environment and that the separation between school and home or community should be reduced as much as possible. Here she is speaking of her Casa dei Bambini: Montessori was one of the first to articulate a critique of didactic education: Now let us imagine … a man appointed, by reason of the original work he has done, to a chair of science in some university, with the task before him of doing further original research work with hymenpetera [insects].

  • This entailed developing a concern for others and discipline and to do this children engaged in exercices de la vie pratique exercise in daily living;
  • This house and those that followed were designed to provide a good environment for children to live and learn;
  • Further reading and references Montessori, M;
  • Here there are a number of parallels with Dewey;
  • I need only give one proof—the stationary desks and chairs … [S]chools were at first furnished with the long, narrow benches upon which the children were crowded together;
  • In this work much attention was paid to recent work in anthropology.

Let us suppose that, arrived at his post, he is shown a glass-covered case containing a number of beautiful butterflies, mounted by means of pins, their outspread wings motionless … With material such as this the experimental scientist can do nothing. The situation would be very much the same if we should place a teacher who … is scientifically prepared in one of the public schools where the children are repressed in the spontaneous expression of their personality till they are almost like dead beings.

Dissertations & Theses

In such a school the children, like butterflies mounted on pins, are fastened each to his place, the desk, spreading the useless wings of barren and meaningless knowledge which they have acquired … The school must permit the free, natural manifestations of the child if in the school scientific pedagogy is to be born … [T]he true concept of liberty is practically unknown to educators … The principle of slavery still pervades pedagogy, and therefore, the same principle pervades the school.

I need only give one proof—the stationary desks and chairs … [S]chools were at first furnished with the long, narrow benches upon which the children were crowded together.

  1. This house had been built as part of a slum redevelopment.
  2. This house had been built as part of a slum redevelopment.
  3. For this teacher we have substituted the didactic material, which contains within itself the control of errors and which makes auto-education possible to each child. The standard work in English is.

Then came science and perfected the bench. In this work much attention was paid to recent work in anthropology. The age of the child and the length of his limbs were considered in placing the seat at the right height. This was done in order that he might be separated from his neighbour. These desks were constructed in such a way as to render the child visible in all his immobility.

  • Maria Montessori 1870 — 1952;
  • This house had been built as part of a slum redevelopment;
  • The history of civilisation is a history of conquest and of liberation.

And often these programs have been compiled in the official department of education, and their use is imposed by law upon the teacher and the child. We know only too well the sorry spectacle of the teacher who, in the ordinary schoolroom, must pour certain cut and dried facts into the heads of scholars. In order to succeed in this barren task, she finds it necessary to discipline her pupils into immobility and to force their attention.

For this teacher we have substituted the didactic material, which contains within itself the control of errors and which makes auto-education possible to each child.

She is not a passive force, a silent presence … From such work, we must await the positive solution of all those pedagogical problems of which we talk today. For through such work there has already come the solution of some of these very questions: We have put the school within the house; and this is not all.

  1. She is not a passive force, a silent presence … From such work, we must await the positive solution of all those pedagogical problems of which we talk today.
  2. The focus on self-realization through independent activity, the concern with attitude, and the focus on the educator as the keeper of the environment and making use of their scientific powers of observation and reflection — all have some echo in the work of informal educators. Montessori was one of the first to articulate a critique of didactic education.
  3. An emphasis was placed on self-determination and self-realization. The age of the child and the length of his limbs were considered in placing the seat at the right height.
  4. We call the individual disciplined when he is master of himself, and can, therefore, regulate his own conduct when it shall be necessary to follow some rule of life … If discipline is to be founded upon liberty, the discipline itself must necessarily be active.
  5. Let us suppose that, arrived at his post, he is shown a glass-covered case containing a number of beautiful butterflies, mounted by means of pins, their outspread wings motionless … With material such as this the experimental scientist can do nothing. The inmates find … the convenience of being able to leave their little ones in a place, not only safe, but where they have every advantage … Until the present time only one class in society might have this advantage.

We have placed it within the [apartment block where the children live] … as the property of the collectivity, leaving under the eyes of the parents the whole life of the teacher in the accomplishment of her high mission. The inmates find … the convenience of being able to leave their little ones in a place, not only safe, but where they have every advantage … Until the present time only one class in society might have this advantage.

  • See The Montessoria Method;
  • She is not a passive force, a silent presence … From such work, we must await the positive solution of all those pedagogical problems of which we talk today.

Rich women were able to go about their various occupations and amusements, leaving their children in the hands of a nurse or a governess.

If a new and scientific pedagogy is to arise from the study of the individual, such study must occupy itself with the study of free children. All forms of slavery tend little by little to weaken and disappear, even the sexual slavery of woman.

Maria Montessori and education

The history of civilisation is a history of conquest and of liberation. Discipline must come through liberty … We do not consider an individual disciplined only when he has been rendered as artificially silent as a mute and as immovable as a paralytic.

He is an individual annihilated, not disciplined. We call the individual disciplined when he is master of himself, and can, therefore, regulate his own conduct when it shall be necessary to follow some rule of life … If discipline is to be founded upon liberty, the discipline itself must necessarily be active.