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A discussion about the history of hinduism

Overview The term Hinduism The term Hinduism became familiar as a designator of religious ideas and practices distinctive to India with the publication of books such as Hinduism 1877 by Sir Monier Monier-Williams, the notable Oxford scholar and author of an influential Sanskrit dictionary.

  1. On the other hand, even cosmopolitan Hindus living in a global environment recognize and value the fact that their religion has developed in the specific context of the Indian subcontinent.
  2. The cultural transformation thesis that Aryan culture is a development of the Indus Valley culture. Nevertheless, some scholars have studied whether there are links between the story of Jesus and that of Krishna; "Krishnology" is a term coined to express these claimed theological parallels between Krishnaism and the Christological dogmas of Christianity.
  3. Finally, others, perhaps the majority, have simply accepted the term Hinduism or its analogues , especially hindu dharma Hindu moral and religious law , in various Indic languages.
  4. The roots of the tradition are also sometimes traced back to the female terra-cotta figurines found ubiquitously in excavations of sites associated with the Indus valley civilization and sometimes interpreted as goddesses.
  5. The cultural transformation thesis that Aryan culture is a development of the Indus Valley culture.

Gradually the distinction became primarily religious rather than ethnic, geographic, or cultural. Since the late 19th century, Hindus have reacted to the term Hinduism in several ways. Some have rejected it in favour of indigenous formulations.

  1. The roots of the tradition are also sometimes traced back to the female terra-cotta figurines found ubiquitously in excavations of sites associated with the Indus valley civilization and sometimes interpreted as goddesses. But later, Christian missionaries sought to convert and westernize the people.
  2. There have been Christian writers such as the 17th century mystic Jane Leade and the 19th-20th century theologian Sergei Bulgakov, who have described the feminine Sophia wisdom as an aspect of the Godhead.
  3. The Holy Trinity of Christianity, consisting of the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit, is sometimes seen as roughly analogous to the Trimurti of Hinduism, whose members -- Brahma , Vishnu and Shiva —are seen as the three principal manifestations of Brahman , or Godhead. There are over 17.
  4. Islam shares common characteristics with Abrahamic religions —those religions claiming descent from the prophet Abraham —being, from oldest to youngest, Judaism , Christianity, Islam. Many reformers emerged during the British Period.
  5. This may serve as a rough analogue to Hinduism's description of Sita in the Ramayana, who is saved by Hanuman an incarnation of Shiva from the demon king Ravana to be reunited with her husband Rama, representing God.

Finally, others, perhaps the majority, have simply accepted the term Hinduism or its analoguesespecially hindu dharma Hindu moral and religious lawin various Indic languages. Since the early 20th century, textbooks on Hinduism have been written by Hindus themselves, often under the rubric of sanatana dharma.

These efforts at self-explanation add a new layer to an elaborate tradition of explaining practice and doctrine that dates to the 1st millennium bce. The roots of Hinduism can be traced back much farther—both textually, to the schools of commentary and debate preserved in epic and Vedic writings from the 2nd millennium bce, and visually, through artistic representations of yaksha s luminous spirits associated with specific locales and natural phenomena and naga s cobralike divinitieswhich were worshipped from about 400 bce.

Hinduism and other religions

The roots of the tradition are also sometimes traced back to the female terra-cotta figurines found ubiquitously in excavations of sites associated with the Indus valley civilization and sometimes interpreted as goddesses. General nature of Hinduism More strikingly than any other major religious communityHindus accept—and indeed celebrate—the organic, multileveled, and sometimes pluralistic nature of their traditions.

These multiple perspectives enhance a broad view of religious truth rather than diminish it; hence, there is a strong tendency for contemporary Hindus to affirm that tolerance is the foremost religious virtue. On the other hand, even cosmopolitan Hindus living in a global environment recognize and value the fact that their religion has developed in the specific context of the Indian subcontinent.

Such a tension between universalist and particularist impulses has long animated the Hindu tradition.

History of Hinduism

When Hindus speak of their religious identity as sanatana dharmathey emphasize its continuous, seemingly eternal sanatana existence and the fact that it describes a web of customs, obligations, traditions, and ideals dharma that far exceeds the Western tendency to think of religion primarily as a system of beliefs. A common way in which English-speaking Hindus often distance themselves from that frame of mind is to insist that Hinduism is not a religion but a way of life.

The five tensile strands Across the sweep of Indian religious history, at least five elements have given shape to the Hindu religious tradition: These five elements, to adopt a typical Hindu metaphorare understood as relating to one another as strands in an elaborate braid.

Moreover, each strand develops out of a history of conversation, elaboration, and challenge.

  • Islam is a strictly monotheistic religion in which the supreme deity is Allah Arabic;
  • The five tensile strands Across the sweep of Indian religious history, at least five elements have given shape to the Hindu religious tradition;
  • The Aryan migration thesis that the Indus Valley groups calling themselves 'Aryans' noble ones migrated into the sub-continent and became the dominant cultural force;
  • Hindus can also worship at home, and many have a special shrine dedicated to certain gods and goddesses.

Hence, in looking for what makes the tradition cohere, it is sometimes better to locate central points of tension than to expect clear agreements on Hindu thought and practice. Here several characteristic tensions appear.

  • Followers of Hinduism can visit the Mandir any time they please;
  • This may serve as a rough analogue to Hinduism's description of Sita in the Ramayana, who is saved by Hanuman an incarnation of Shiva from the demon king Ravana to be reunited with her husband Rama, representing God;
  • Here several characteristic tensions appear;
  • Christianity revolves heavily around the life of Jesus Christ as detailed in the Bible, whereas Hinduism is not based on any one personality or one book, but rather on the philosophy that there is a god, or no god and just self, etc;
  • In Western countries, Vedanta has influenced some Christian thinkers, See also:

One concerns the relationship between the divine and the world. Another tension concerns the disparity between the world-preserving ideal of dharma and that of moksha release from an inherently flawed world.

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  • Earth contains the plant god Soma, the fire god Agni, and the god of priestly power, Brhaspati;
  • Some of the most well-known include;
  • Moreover, each strand develops out of a history of conversation, elaboration, and challenge;
  • Nevertheless, although the concept that we can come to know God through sophia has played a role in Christian thought, no major Christian denominations profess Sophia as an independent aspect of God;
  • Visit Website Around 1500 B.