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A review of the battles of the revolutionary war by wj wood

Summary Summary The Americans didn't simply outlast the British, nor was the war just a glorified guerrilla action with sporadic skirmishes, says W.

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Americans won their independence on the battlefield by employing superior strategies, tactics, and leadership in the battles of Bunker Hill, Quebec, Trenton, Princeton, Saratoga, and Cowpens, among many others. Here in this groundbreaking book are detailed accounts of attempts by commanders to adapt their forces to the ever-shifting battlefield of the Revolutionary War, as well as analyses of the factors that determined the eventual American victory.

Battles of the Revolutionary War is designed for "armchair strategist," with dozens of illustrations and maps--many specially prepared for this volume--of the weapons, battle plans, and combatants. It's an insider's look at the dramatic times and colorful personalities that accompanied the birth of this country. Reviews 3 Booklist Review Wood, a retired army colonel, provides dynamic reenactments of some of the most significant campaigns, battles, and skirmishes of the American Revolution.

The confrontations have been carefully chosen and render a good sense of the military patterns of the war as well as recognition of the true heroes. Wood restores Benedict Arnold to glory on the battlefield at leastreveals some of Washington's most amazing blunders, and credits the Prussian Baron Von Steuben with the transformation of ragtag Continentals into trained troops that turned the tide of the war.

An appealing entry in Algonquin's Major Battles and Campaigns series.

  • The victory convinced France, Spain and Holland to openly join the American cause;
  • While Arnold won the battle he also delayed a British retreat and the large American force was able to surround the English;
  • The confrontations have been carefully chosen and render a good sense of the military patterns of the war as well as recognition of the true heroes;
  • It's an insider's look at the dramatic times and colorful personalities that accompanied the birth of this country.

Maps and bibliography; to be indexed. D'Este, author of previous works on Overlord and Sicily, takes a strategic perspective, focussing on Anglo-American cooperation in the central Mediterranean. Wood's battle history of the American Revolution is tactically oriented. D'Este argues that the Allies and the Germans had essentially the same limited purpose: Neither of the principal Allied commanders, Harold Alexander and Mark Clark, had the character or the talent to make the Mediterranean theater more than a dead end.

Battles of the Revolutionary War: 1775-1781

D'Este avoids discussing the campaign's grand strategic aspects and ignores British operations in the eastern Mediterranean. Nevertheless, his presentation is sound within its set limits. A paperback edition would be welcome collateral reading for courses in World War II. Specialists will find little new in Wood's pages, but troop movements and command decisions are presented well and perceptively critiqued. In arguing for the uniqueness of Revolutionary battles, Wood fails to delineate clear principles of selection.

  1. The British had lost their entire 820 man force captured while America had just 12 killed.
  2. Washington and most of his army escaped a massacre however the British under General Howe went on to capture Fort Washington and Fort Lee.
  3. In arguing for the uniqueness of Revolutionary battles, Wood fails to delineate clear principles of selection. It was Christmas day and Washington presumed the Hessians would be celebrating.
  4. D'Este, author of previous works on Overlord and Sicily, takes a strategic perspective, focussing on Anglo-American cooperation in the central Mediterranean.
  5. D'Este, author of previous works on Overlord and Sicily, takes a strategic perspective, focussing on Anglo-American cooperation in the central Mediterranean. Specialists will find little new in Wood's pages, but troop movements and command decisions are presented well and perceptively critiqued.

Neither political, strategic, nor institutional contexts are well developed. Choice Review Wood analyzes the battles of Bunker Hill, Quebec, Trention and Princetion, Brandywine, Oriskany, Bennington, Saratoga, Kings Mountain, Cowpens, Guilford Courthouse, and the Chesapeake Capes to prove that Americans did not simply outlast the British or defeat them by using unconventional methods, such as guerrilla warfare, but that they won their independence on the battlefield by employing superior strategies, tactics, and leadership.

At the same time he shows clearly that each battle was unique in terms of physical setting, type of forces involved, and conduct.

  1. D'Este avoids discussing the campaign's grand strategic aspects and ignores British operations in the eastern Mediterranean.
  2. Wood's battle history of the American Revolution is tactically oriented. Specialists will find little new in Wood's pages, but troop movements and command decisions are presented well and perceptively critiqued.
  3. He was then replaced for some odd reason by General Horatio Gates.
  4. Maps and bibliography; to be indexed. Neither political, strategic, nor institutional contexts are well developed.

Wood's arguments are generally sound, though he is sometimes guilty of raising straw men or of contesting interpretations that in fact have been long abandoned by historians. This is surprising considering the completeness of his "essay on sources. Mitchell's Decisive Battles of the American Revolution 1962 for general and undergraduate readers.