Homeworks academic writing service


A history of fashion influences in world war i and ii

Utility fashions hit the high street souvenirs and ephemera Utility fashions hit the high street In 1942, the first 'Utility' clothes went on sale on the British high street as part of a government scheme.

These clothes were made from a limited range of quality controlled fabrics. The Utility scheme developed out of a need to make production of civilian clothing in British factories more efficient and to provide price-regulated better quality clothing. See object record Until Utility clothing was introduced, the less well-off had to use the same number of coupons for cheaper garments that might wear out in half the time.

Utility fabrics - and clothes made from these materials - gave the public a guarantee of quality and value for their money and coupons.

How did WW2 change the way people dressed?

In autumn 1941 it became compulsory for all Utility cloths and garments to be marked 'CC41'. It is seen here printed onto a pair of men's socks photographs Strict rules for fashion - the austerity restrictions photographs Strict rules for fashion - the austerity restrictions Utility clothing came in a limited range of garments, styles and fabrics.

  1. These clothes were made from a limited range of quality controlled fabrics. Lapels had to be within a certain size.
  2. Edward Molyneux and Charles Creed joined soon after. Utility fabrics - and clothes made from these materials - gave the public a guarantee of quality and value for their money and coupons.
  3. Utility fabrics - and clothes made from these materials - gave the public a guarantee of quality and value for their money and coupons.
  4. As well as using Utility materials, the designers also had to work within the austerity regulations. Braces would have been a vital element of a man's outfit as both zip fasteners and elastic waistbands were banned under the austerity regulations.
  5. The Utility scheme developed out of a need to make production of civilian clothing in British factories more efficient and to provide price-regulated better quality clothing. See object record Until Utility clothing was introduced, the less well-off had to use the same number of coupons for cheaper garments that might wear out in half the time.

In 1942 and 1943, the Board of Trade introduced the Making-up of Civilian Clothing Restrictions Orders to make further savings of labour and materials and minimise manufacturing costs.

These orders, often known as the 'austerity regulations', applied to the production of both Utility and non-Utility clothing. Some of the most unpopular austerity regulations were those that applied to men's clothing.

Single-breasted suits replaced double-breasted.

Lapels had to be within a certain size. The number of pockets was restricted and trouser turn-ups were abolished.

The ban on turn-ups was particularly unpopular, and many men circumvented this regulation by buying trousers that were too long and having them altered at home. The length of men's shirts was restricted and double cuffs were banned.

Braces would have been a vital element of a man's outfit as both zip fasteners and elastic waistbands were banned under the austerity regulations. Elastic was in very short supply throughout the war, and women's knickers were one of only a small number of garments where the use of elastic was permitted. The government was at pains to reassure the public that 'the Board of Trade have no wish to adopt the role of fashion dictator'.

It brought in leading fashion designers to design a prototype range of Utility clothing which were attractive, stylish and very varied. The Incorporated Society of London Fashion Designers IncSoc was founded in 1942 to represent the collective interests of the fashion industry in Britain, promote exports and develop standards of design.

There were originally eight members: Edward Molyneux and Charles Creed joined soon after. They were commissioned by the Board of Trade to produce designs for stylish yet economical outfits that could be produced under the Utility scheme. As well as using Utility materials, the designers also had to work within the austerity regulations.