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Why helen keller inspired so many people essays

An Inspiration to Many American Women June 17, 2004 Can you imagine a life without being able to see or hear and not knowing how to communicate with anyone around you?

That world of darkness is what Helen Keller lived in for six years.

  • Helen's greatest inspiration and life long companion, Anne Sullivan, arrived at her home in Alabama in March of 1887;
  • Helen's "fixed purpose" hopefully inspires disabled people to set goals and then try to achieve them, even if those dreams and ambitions need to be amended along the way;
  • Helen certainly proves, that by being open-minded and having aspirations, anything is possible.

Helen Keller has been an inspiration to people ever since she turned six. From 1886-1960, she proved herself to be a creative and inspiring woman of America. She was a writer and lecturer who fought for the rights of disadvantaged people all over the world.

Helen Keller: An Inspiration to Many

Most importantly, she overcame her two most difficult obstacles, being blind and deaf. Helen Keller devoted her life to improving the education and treatment of the blind, deaf, and mute and fighting for minorities as well. Helen Keller was one of the first to educate the public and make them aware of inflicted individuals' potential.

Because of her persistence and strength, she is considered a creative and unique spirit by many people of the world, especially those who can relate to her physical impairments. Helen Keller was born a healthy child. When Helen was 19 months old, she became ill with what was known as acute congestion of the brain and stomach; this is what doctors called brain fever.

  • He felt that there was a way to teach Helen and he suggested to the family that they seek the help of Alexander Graham Bell who had turned his work from the telephone to helping deaf children;
  • Crazy as it sounds, there are many out there who don't know who Helen Keller was;
  • She was expected to die but instead this sickness left her blind, deaf, and mute;
  • Helen received many awards during her lifetime for her dedication to the upliftment of disabled persons, and using her influence, she tirelessly campaigned for the rights of disabled people, helping to transform the environment into a more engaging and promising one for disabled people;
  • From 1886-1960, she proved herself to be a creative and inspiring woman of America;
  • Helen certainly proves, that by being open-minded and having aspirations, anything is possible.

She was expected to die but instead this sickness left her blind, deaf, and mute. Obviously her attempts were not always successful. When she failed to communicate she would throw fits and have outburst that would upset not only her, but her family as well.

Helens problem became a burden on the family and the family decided to seek advice from others on how to handle Helen. Because of these violent fits, she appeared to be a very unruly child, but underneath all of the tragedy was a future inspirational figure that would surprise the world with amazing and countless abilities.

A large amount of Helen's accomplishments would not have been possible if it weren't for her mother and father. Helens mother Kate had read in the book American Notes by Charles Dickens about the work that had been done with another child, Laura Bridgman, which was deaf and blind as well Bowie, 1963.

  1. Crazy as it sounds, there are many out there who don't know who Helen Keller was. To support this project, please visit the Kickstarter page for Three Days to See.
  2. As a child, she has fears and experiences such as the storm, the ocean and The Frost King incident, all of which impact her life.
  3. Because of her persistence and strength, she is considered a creative and unique spirit by many people of the world, especially those who can relate to her physical impairments. A large amount of Helen's accomplishments would not have been possible if it weren't for her mother and father.
  4. The production will premiere on March 8th and 9th at Highways Performance Space, a historical landmark of the LA arts scene. The fact that Helen Keller recognizes that she can help others, despite her own immense challenges, is testament to her self-awareness and complete selflessness.

The family traveled to Baltimore to see a specialist where it was confirmed that Helen would never see nor hear again. The doctor did tell the family not to give up hope on Helen.

  1. When Helen was 19 months old, she became ill with what was known as acute congestion of the brain and stomach; this is what doctors called brain fever. In "The Story of My Life," the reader gets a glimpse of the highs and lows of the first twenty-two years of Helen's difficult life, Helen having being left blind and deaf after an illness as a baby.
  2. It is used to finger spell words.
  3. Helen Keller was born a healthy child. Helen certainly proves, that by being open-minded and having aspirations, anything is possible.
  4. The first word that she taught her was doll and the second word she taught her was cake. Helens mother Kate had read in the book American Notes by Charles Dickens about the work that had been done with another child, Laura Bridgman, which was deaf and blind as well Bowie, 1963.
  5. The film also incorporates language from Helen Keller's groundbreaking 1933 essay "Three Days To See," written as a light of hope during the dark days of the Depression.

He felt that there was a way to teach Helen and he suggested to the family that they seek the help of Alexander Graham Bell who had turned his work from the telephone to helping deaf children. The family did seek his advice and Bell was so fascinated by six year old Helen that he recommended that she contact Michael Anagnos at the Perkins Institute for the Blind in Boston to see if he could find someone to teach Helen.

Helen Keller Continues to Inspire

Anne Sullivan, who was also a recent Perkins graduate, was suggested to be Helen's teacher by Michael Anagnos. Helen's greatest inspiration and life long companion, Anne Sullivan, arrived at her home in Alabama in March of 1887.

Anne herself had become partially blind at the age of 5. She had been able to have surgery on her eyes while she was at the Perkins which helped her be able to read normal writing for brief periods of time. In just a couple of weeks, Helen learned that everything had a name and that she could communicate with others by using the manual alphabet.

  • Here's a brief look at some of our recent favorites;
  • Helen Keller devoted her life to improving the education and treatment of the blind, deaf, and mute and fighting for minorities as well;
  • Helens mother Kate had read in the book American Notes by Charles Dickens about the work that had been done with another child, Laura Bridgman, which was deaf and blind as well Bowie, 1963;
  • The boxes represent Helen's hardships, and the movement represents her discoveries of expression;
  • She had been able to have surgery on her eyes while she was at the Perkins which helped her be able to read normal writing for brief periods of time.

Helen also found that she could use the manual alphabet and lip reading to prove her intelligence. The manual alphabet is a system that contains 26 hand symbols, one for each letter of the alphabet.

It is used to finger spell words. The first word that she taught her was doll and the second word she taught her was cake. It was still hard for Helen to fully understand what these words meant but Anne continued to work with Helen.