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The purpose of the battle of yorktown

The city was designed to be a shipping port for tobacco from Europe. Before the Revolutionary War the town was known simply as York. Afterward it was renamed Yorktown. The Battle of Yorktown was a memorable one: Lord Cornwallis agreed to this after being promised reinforcements from New York. German engraving of Lord Cornwallis' surrender at the Battle of Yorktown.

  • A British rescue fleet, two-thirds the size of the French, set out for Virginia on October 17 with some 7,000 British troops, but it was too late;
  • Lord Cornwallis agreed to this after being promised reinforcements from New York;
  • Let's now look at the participants of this battle and the timeline of events in some detail;
  • End of the Battle and After-effects After looking at the summary and timeline of the Battle of Yorktown, let us now look at its conclusion, aftermath, and its significance in the American Revolution;
  • However, he was dissuaded by Rochambeau, who recommended to attack the British near the Virginia coast, because of the strong presence of the French navy under de Grasse in that area;
  • Casualties on both sides were relatively light.

Washington, along with French General de Rochambeau, was trying to find a way to take New York when a messenger boy arrived with the news of the British encampment in Yorktown. Washington decided to go down and take back the fort in which the British were staked.

History of the Siege

When Corwallis received the news, he was left with the choice to flee to New York, where he risked running into the French; flee to North Carolina, where safety was also not certain; or stand and fight Washington's army. He chose to stay, his only hope lying in the soldiers he was promised by Clinton. When he saw how many more American soldiers than British there were, he tried to flee across the York river to the fort he had taken on the other side.

As soon as he left his current fort, the Americans took it.

  • Washington changed his strategy to make Clinton think he was planning to attack him, while instead sneaking away to the south to trap Cornwallis;
  • The painting depicts George Washington and the comte de Rochambeau giving orders during the siege.

His attempt to cross the river failed, due to a storm that was tossing the waters badly, making it impossible to cross. The French ships arrived the next day, cutting off all hope of reinforcements from General Clinton.

By this time the Americans had begun to fire on the British army and things were looking bad for Lord Cornwallis.

Timeline, Effects, and Significance of the Battle of Yorktown (1781)

The Surrender All of the British supplies had been lost to the Americans when Cornwallis had fled the fort. His only option now was to surrender or die.

Battle of Yorktown begins

On October 19, the second in command of the British army came out in place of Lord Cornwallis—who feigned illness because he could not bear the shame—to present the earl's sword, ending the Battle of Yorktown in a complete British surrender.

When he returned to England, his name had been dragged through the mud. In later years, he would be known as the man who lost America. Unfinished Treaty of Paris painting by B. West The Battle of Yorktown was the last major battles before the signing of the Treaty of Paris in September of 1783.

  1. West The Battle of Yorktown was the last major battles before the signing of the Treaty of Paris in September of 1783. On September 5, they encountered the British fleet in a naval engagement known as the Battle of the Capes.
  2. The Americans and French marched from Williamsburg to Yorktown on September 28 and began digging a trench 800 yards from the British defense line to begin a siege. On October 19, in a spectacle incredible to all who witnessed it, most of Cornwallis' army marched out of Yorktown between two lines of allied soldiers--Americans on one side and French on the other--that stretched for more than one mile.
  3. However, he was dissuaded by Rochambeau, who recommended to attack the British near the Virginia coast, because of the strong presence of the French navy under de Grasse in that area.

During the signing, the British were asked to pose for a painting for the history books, but they refused to face forward. The painting is still incomplete. Siege of Fort St. Jean Siege of Boston.