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Reasons for not implementing environment friendly technology

In 1992, more than 170 countries came together at the Rio Earth Summit and agreed to pursue sustainable developmentprotect biological diversityprevent dangerous interference with climate systemsand conserve forests.

But, 25 years later, the natural systems on which humanity relies continue to be degraded.

  1. These strategies are often simple and can be implemented into any kind of construction project.
  2. Consider the following key environmental indicators. Some of these materials are more affordable than their commercial counterparts.
  3. Politicians need to have the courage to go well beyond current standards. Second, governments need to provide a viable transition pathway for industries that are doing the most damage.
  4. The interior of a building can also benefit from wind turbines, maintaining indoor air quality and reducing utility investments. Additionally, water condensation from HVAC units can also be collected and used for similar reasons.

This is the question that a team of researchers and I have tried to answer in a recent article. We reviewed 94 studies of how sustainability policies had failed across every continent. These included case studies from both developed and developing countries, and ranged in scope from international to local initiatives. Consider the following key environmental indicators.

Greenhouse gas emissions that drive climate change have almost doubled while the impacts of climate change are becoming increasingly apparent.

The rate at which these indicators deteriorated was largely unchanged over the two decades either side of the Rio summit.

  • This not only makes the building eco-friendly, it creates indoor spaces in homes, offices, and recreational areas;
  • Some of these materials are more affordable than their commercial counterparts;
  • New environmental tax breaks and grants, for example, could allow businesses to remain profitable while changing their business model;
  • First, governments need to provide financial incentives to switch to eco-efficient production.

Furthermore, humanity is fast approaching several environmental tipping points. If crossed, these could lead to irreversible changes. We found that three types of failure kept recurring: The economic failures stem from the basic problem that environmentally damaging activities are financially rewarded.

What’s going wrong?

This is often because large extractive industries, like mining, are dominant players in an economy and see themselves as having the most to lose.

Communication failures centre on poor consultation or community involvement in the policy process. Opposition then flourishes, sometimes based on a misunderstanding of the severity of the issue.

It can also be fed by mistrust when communities see their concerns being overlooked. Again, this happens around the world. A good example would be community resistance to changing water allocation systems in rural areas of Australia.

In this situation, farmers were so opposed to the government buying back some of their water permits that copies of the policy were burned in the street. These types of failure are mutually reinforcing. Poor communication of the benefits of sustainable development creates the belief that it always costs jobs and money.

Businesses and communities then pressure politicians to avoid or water down environmentally friendly legislation.

  • These included case studies from both developed and developing countries, and ranged in scope from international to local initiatives;
  • Furthermore, rapid population growth demands that we address issues of sustainability and resourcefulness sooner rather than later.

As a result, decision-makers are stuck in the jobs-versus-environment mindset. What can we do? The point of our paper was to discover why policies that promote sustainability have failed in order to improve future efforts.

  1. These included case studies from both developed and developing countries, and ranged in scope from international to local initiatives. Recycling water takes advantage of resources that are readily available, which would otherwise go down the drain.
  2. A good example would be community resistance to changing water allocation systems in rural areas of Australia. These strategies are often simple and can be implemented into any kind of construction project.
  3. By using recycled and sustainable materials, construction companies will be able to avoid additional costs associated with the disposal of toxic materials from the site. With green construction, emphasis is placed on the use of locally-sourced materials.
  4. Finally, leaders from all sectors need to be convinced of both the seriousness of the declining state of the environment and that sustainable development is possible. Using eco-friendly materials in our residential, commercial and industrial buildings will prove to be a long-term benefit for all.

Based on my previous research into the way economic, social and environmental goals can co-existI would go beyond our most recent paper to make the following proposals. First, governments need to provide financial incentives to switch to eco-efficient production.

How to Implement Eco-Friendly Construction Strategies

Politicians need to have the courage to go well beyond current standards. Well-targeted interventions can create both carrot and stick, rewarding eco-friendly behaviour and imposing a cost on unsustainable activities.

Second, governments need to provide a viable transition pathway for industries that are doing the most damage. New environmental tax breaks and grants, for example, could allow businesses to remain profitable while changing their business model.

  • May 11th, 2016 by Chris;
  • Smart, eco-friendly techniques include rain water collection systems for example;
  • Opposition then flourishes, sometimes based on a misunderstanding of the severity of the issue;
  • Also, when developing a structure, encourage the addition of green spaces on rooftops or in other parts of a building;
  • By using recycled and sustainable materials, construction companies will be able to avoid additional costs associated with the disposal of toxic materials from the site.

Finally, leaders from all sectors need to be convinced of both the seriousness of the declining state of the environment and that sustainable development is possible. Promoting positive case studies of successful green businesses would be a start. There will of course be resistance to these changes. The policy battles will be hard fought, particularly in the current international political climate. We live in a world where the US president is rolling back climate policies while the Australian prime minister attacks renewable energy.