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4222 305 promote cntred approaches in health and social care

Emma Gardner Unit 305 1.

  • When we put a positive value judgment of our identity, we feel better and have more positive self-esteem;
  • When we put a positive value judgment of our identity, we feel better and have more positive self-esteem;
  • The values which one person feels are important in their life may not be so to another;
  • Self-esteem is all about being confident in who we are and out sense of value;
  • Self esteem is being Confident in one's own worth or abilities; self-respect, having a positive self image and pride in oneself;
  • It makes sense, therefore, to review what you are doing on an ongoing basis.

It focuses on the need and the best way to get the need of the individual met. Just because a group of people have the same condition, this does not mean they need the same care, as everyone is different. Humans are holistic beings and need to be treated with respect, dignity and supported to be as independent as possible to care for themselves in 4222 305 promote cntred approaches in health and social care best possible way.

Tailor making the care to benefit the individual working with them to help support them physically, emotionally, socially and cognitively. If an individual cannot wash, dress or cook without support their self-worth will drop and prevent them from leading a life with value and meaning. Emotionally, offering them a listening ear, empathy and understanding gives them a feeling of self-worth and that someone cares, building a relationship and trust, which is essential in challenging situations and for working together.

The person does not feel trapped. Teaching them about any dangers and signposting them to get the support they need will build their confidence. Cognitively helping someone find an activity they enjoy which will keep their mind active such as crosswords or reading. People tend to be quiet when they are around people they do not know. People are also usually unable to recall things on cue, such as what they like or want, unless it is an instinct.

If a male is sent in to aid a woman who has a fear of men due to a history of domestic violence, then trust will be broken and hard to rebuild. This is not in their best interest, it is in the best interest of the person pressurising them. Remember you are working to support the client and not their family. As people are different although their plans may be similar, what needs to be achieved will be different, for example: Bathing someone daily may be an obvious action, but each person will have a different objective to achieve the outcome: These needs and preferences include: There are different ways to establish consent: The person must have full information of: If a person has said yes to blood tests, they can decide at any point that they do not want that to continue and the action must be safely stopped immediately.

If consent has been refused for any reason, then it should be written down in records and reported to your supervisor.

This is done to protect staff from legal action as well as the rights of the client. Enabling every person to take part in everyday activities and relationships, no matter their ability.

Not excluding them because you feel it would not be suitable for them or you feel they cannot take part, that it may take up too much of your time or it would be a hindrance to your working day. Explain to people who are reluctant to allow active participation the benefits of doing so. For people that understand the importance of active participation, it might be useful to get them to explain the benefits, especially if they are close to the person who needs encouragement.

Explain the benefits to people and provide evidence if possible where a person has made an achievement no matter how big or small. For example saying to a family that last week Alice made a cup of tea for herself.

  • Service users know themselves best, so we should listen and respect even if we disagree;
  • You can identify who else you might be able to get involved to help out and consider if an advocate would be necessary.

I only had to pour the hot water, and Alice did the rest for herself, so she needed less supervision. We can now put something in place for Alice so she can pour hot water sadly, so she has made that step closer to independence and caring for herself.

Then also weigh up all the positive and negative outcomes of each decision which could be made. These people are impartial to the emotions that may be experienced in making a decision and help to make the decision in the best interest of the individual and not the other people emotionally involved. Once a decision has been made, then an individual may still need support to follow through with the decision.

Ultimately it will not be the individuals decision, it will be what the member of staff thought was the best decision for the service user. The individual has the right to make their own decision.

The individual may then feel under pressure and worry about the decision made, regretting that decision. Get the full information around the decision that has been made and get the individual to question and challenge that decision. You can then provide the individual with full information in an unbiased way to look at additional options for them or to make them feel more at ease with the decision made. Again ultimately the individual has a right to make their own decision and if the individual wishes to change a decision that has been made, then speak to your supervisor, note and report all steps taken and agree a new risk assessment to help make these changes safely, with minimal risk to the individual.

If an individual sees themselves as a negative person or if they are being controlled, so cannot express who they are, then they are unlikely to feel like they have little value or little to offer anyone around them.

They fell like they have no identity or that their identity has been taken away from them.

  1. I believe that working this way is good for service users and they feel important, feel respected and active part of their care.
  2. Arranging a meeting to address their concerns can also be done. It is about our roles and about belonging to a cultural group.
  3. People are also usually unable to recall things on cue, such as what they like or want, unless it is an instinct.
  4. By knowing about their likes, dislikes and beliefs, then conversation and suggestions can be made which reinforce that that it is ok to be who they are. Person - centred is roughly providing attention and reinforcer that is centred or focused on the various prenominal and their consumes.
  5. Wellbeing is a feeling that you are feeling well and doing well.

This can lead to isolation, not wanting to look after themselves, not eating or caring about themselves. If an individual thinks they are a good person and are given the opportunity to grow and experiment with who they want to be, then they will grow in confidence and care about how they present to others in their appearance, behaviour and give back to the community around them.

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Emotional — having close relationships such as loved ones, best friends etc. Spiritual — having things that enrich their lives such as music, art, poetry etc.

  1. If a male is sent in to aid a woman who has a fear of men due to a history of domestic violence, then trust will be broken and hard to rebuild. The individual is at the centre of the care and are involved in every aspect of it.
  2. They are then able to make an informed choice about wether to continue with the activity or not. Values and attitudes also contribute to wellbeing.
  3. The national minimum standards are explicit in focusing on the individual. Hannah Woolmington Risk assessments are used in various ways in your workplace.
  4. You must ensure that you do not pressure people into discussing more than they want to. It is usually create verbally by someone who has been ingenious to do it.
  5. It is easy to take over when someone is very upset, but you need to check carefully that you are following the choices that people make.

Religious — having the right to be able to pray, attend church or a synagogue Cultural — having the right to follow their own beliefs and customs such as wearing traditional clothing Political — having the right to an opinion and having their say, such as being able to vote 6. By knowing about their likes, dislikes and beliefs, then conversation and suggestions can be made which reinforce that that it is ok to be who they are. If an individual is a Catholic and you are talking about the Church of England, then this could put them in shame and they could feel as if they were doing something wrong.

For example if an individual is 6. Also by ensuring they are as safe and comfortable as possible, mentally, physically and emotionally. Such as the service user slipping in the bath or the carer injuring their back moving the service user. We take risks every day when we step outside and get in our car to drive to work. We could be involved in an accident or endanger a pedestrian crossing the road if we or they are not paying attention.

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By making a risk assessment, it looks at all the risks involved in an activity and how those risks can be reduced, so activities can be carried out with the minimal chance of injury. By providing a wheelchair and a carer for this person, it will reduce the risk of the person being injured, making it safer and a more sensible option, as it is providing a duty of care to the service user.

They are written with this in mind, so it is the best course of action to follow. When anything changes then so does the risk level and the risk assessment must accommodate this, such as: