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Bookreport the double helix by james watson

The search for a non-fiction book that would peak my interests in science, brought me to The Double Helix. The Double Helix book seemed to do just that. This recount of events from J. This non-fiction memoir takes place over the span of three years; from 1950-1953. During this time period, the scientific community was blossoming, and scientists worldwide aspired to discover the truth behind life our lives, what we call the double helix.

This memoir from James Watson, recounts his memories of the scientific discoveries he made over the span of three years. During this time, the work and collaboration of many different scientific figures led him to his historical discovery.

The Double Helix - Forward, Preface and Chapter 1 Summary & Analysis

This book strays away from being a conventional recollection reserved for those with the highest understanding of biology and genetics, by providing equal parts of both his work on proteins and crystallography with the personal life and personalities of the scientist involved with his work.

Feeling as though he was wasting his time, Watson moved to Cambridge University in England to pursue his interest in understanding genes. There he met the loud and boisterous Francis Crick, a molecular biologist who also had an interest in the secrets of genes.

During this time, worldwide scientific advancements were arising left and right. Tensions were running high because of the renowned American scientist Linus Pauling, who was quickly approaching the idea of the double helix.

  • During this time period, the scientific community was blossoming, and scientists worldwide aspired to discover the truth behind life our lives, what we call the double helix;
  • He judges her on her professionalism, appearance, knowledge, and personal life giving off a very negative impression;
  • Author, Context, and Trivia;
  • Author, Context, and Trivia;
  • The mid-section of the book deals with their attempts to persuade scientists of their ideas, however they found themselves at a halt in their research.

Knowing that time was running low, Watson and Crick created models to pursuit, and work off crystallographic photos of DNA provided by female scientist Rosalind Franklin who worked in London. The mid-section of the book deals with their attempts to persuade scientists of their ideas, however they found themselves at a halt in their research. The idea of a triple-helix formation that Watson and Crick had been developing, eventually lacked the recognition they had hoped for.

Rosalind Franklin seemed adamant to say that there was no evidence that DNA was helical, and proved some of the information they developed to be wrong. Watson and Crick were then asked by their superior, Sir Lawrence Bragg, to put their work to rest. Life in the lab continued for Watson and Crick, working on mundane projects, and continuously creating conflicts with Rosalind.

Soon however, Linus Pauling published a paper regarding his theory of DNA, giving Watson the lust for competition once again.

Forward, Preface and Chapter 1 Summary

This rekindled the spark in Watson and Cricks determination to beat Pauling to the answer. Through quick yet thorough research, Watson's theory won the support and of fellow colleagues and scientists. At the age of 25, James Watson had unveiled the secret to life.

This book covers the process of reaching a goal. Rosalind Franklin and Francis Crick played a large role in his scientific discoveries, and Linus Pauling supplied the drive and determination for Watson to follow through with his goal. In addition, I found that this book also covers the concept of accreditation; moreover, it allows readers to form their own opinion on how credit should given to people in the scientific field.

Not only is this book significant as a reference to the scientific discoveries that led us to where we are today, but it provides a good lesson in respect to perseverance, and determination. The events that took place between chapters five and six are the most inspiring in the book.

They made the best use of their resources, and worked to develop an idea that was fully their own. I enjoyed this section of the book the most because I appreciated the independence of their work. Towards the end of the book, it seemed as though they were taking Rosalind and Pauling's work for granted. Because of this, the beginning chapters proved to me that these men had the proper knowledge to get them where they needed to go, and were able to devote themselves to their work.

Because of this, I would recommend that every student read The Double Helix, and that it be incorporated in the curriculum of biology classes. One of the main themes I noticed bookreport the double helix by james watson the presence of bias. However, this book is well known for having some wrong information, because of the fact that James Watson wrote everything as he remembered it. Secondly, the theme of sexism and women bookreport the double helix by james watson science is very apparent.

The only female scientist mentioned in this entire book is Rosalind Franklin, who is constantly criticized by Watson. He judges her on her professionalism, appearance, knowledge, and personal life giving off a very negative impression. The lack of mention she received when Watson and Crick won the Nobel Prize is very controversial; that event set an impression of how women were viewed in the field of science at that point in history.

In this tribute, Watson describes his latter friendship with Franklin outside of the timeframe of the book, and disclosed that she had a very large impact on his work. Lastly, the morals of copying and consent is an underlying theme in The Double Helix.

Author, Context, and Trivia: James Watson participated in the writing of several books; all of which are about DNA and genetics.

Book report #1

The Secret to Life. Aside from novels, Watson has produced numerous scientific papers that have shaped the scientific community we live in today, and textbooks that are still administered in biology classes. Overall, this book is good evidence of the truth behind the scientific community. Everything is a competition for the right answer, and even though some work harder than others, accreditation can be viewed as a complicated and unfair system.

I would recommend this book to anyone interested in biology, or the world of science. Powered by Create your own unique website with customizable templates.